Greek poetry in the Roman Empire

The third lecture in the Language, Culture and Myths series of online talks in English is by Prof Tim Whitmarsh FBA is the A. G. Leventis Professor of Greek Culture at the University of Cambridge.

Why did Greeks still write poetry during the Roman Empire? What did they write about? Did they follow traditional patterns, or innovate? Did they use the old quantitative metres, or the new stress rhythms? This talk considers a range of poetic devices, with a particular emphasis on popular poetry, where some new evidence will be introduced.

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Prof Tim Whitmarsh FBA

Currently is the A. G. Leventis Professor of Greek Culture at the University of Cambridge. He has written on ancient Greek literature and culture over a 1000-year period, with a particular emphasis on the literature of the Roman Empire. His books include Beyond the Second Sophistic: Adventures in Greek Postclassicism, Battling the Gods: Atheism in the Ancient World, and Dirty Love: The Genealogy of the Ancient Greek Novel’.

Organisers

This series of online talks have been organised by The Hellenic Centre and The Cambridge Centre for Greek Studies, University of Cambridge every Wednesday at 7pm (UK time) from 10 March until 31 March 2021.

Language, Culture and Myths

A series of online talks in English, organised by The Hellenic Centre and The Cambridge Centre for Greek Studies, University of Cambridge every Wednesday at 7pm from 10 March – 31 March 2021.

View all lectures in the series